After spending most of your life working and paying into Social Security, one day, you may become unable to continue working due to your age or perhaps your declining health. You may consider filing for disability benefits. Applying for disability benefits may feel intimidating and confusing. Many people are left wondering, “Do I need a lawyer for social security disability?” 

Do I Need a Lawyer for Social Security Disability?

While you are not required to hire a lawyer during the Social Security Disability application process, having legal counsel will significantly decrease your chances of being denied benefits. Many people assume that the application process is quick, easy, and only requires filling out a few forms. This is not the case when it comes to applying for disability benefits. The application process can be complex, and it requires extensive paperwork, medical records, and other personal information. Errors or omissions could impact your claim negatively and may result in a denial of benefits. If you were denied benefits, having a disability attorney to help you through the next steps will make the process much easier. 

What Is Required When Applying For Disability? 

When applying for disability, you will need to present information about your medical condition, work history, and other personal information. It is crucial to provide complete and accurate information during the application process. 

A Disability Attorney Can Help You Organize the Required Information

Compiling all of the required information on your own can be difficult and tedious. A disability attorney can assist you in organizing the correct information and ensuring it is comprehensive and satisfactory. 

Medical Information

  • Name, address, and telephone number of all treating physicians 
  • Dates and names of any medical tests you have undergone
  • Names of medications you are taking and the prescribing doctor

Personal Information

  • Your social security number
  • Your date and place of birth
  • Name and birth dates of any children who are minors
  • Your current or former spouse’s social security number and date of birth as well as the place of marriage and date of divorce or death if applicable
  • Your banking information including bank name and routing number or account number

Work Information

  • Names and addresses of employers from the current year and year prior
  • A copy of your Social Security Statement
  • The amount of money earned in the current year and previous year
  • A list of up to five jobs you have had in the last 15 years with dates of employment
  • Information regarding any workers’ compensation benefits you field or intended to file for
  • The start and end dates of any active-duty U.S. military service prior to 1968

What Happens If I Am Denied Benefits?

Finding out that you have been denied your benefits can feel frightening, but a majority of clients are denied on the application. There are many reasons why your disability claim may have been denied and it can be remedied. You may have filed the incorrect claim type, failed to show adequate medical proof, you may earn too much money, or it could be something else. If you were denied, your claim could be reevaluated during the appeals process. It is not recommended to attempt an appeal without the assistance of a knowledgeable disability attorney. Disability attorneys have experience with the Social Security claims process as well as insights into the specific requirements to get approval. 

The Law Offices of Karen Kraus Bill Can Help

Whether you are applying for the first time or need to appeal a denial, the disability attorneys at the Law Offices of Karen Kraus Bill are ready to assist you. Applying for SSDI or SSI on your own might seem straightforward at first, but you will quickly discover a lot goes into the process. Mistakes or missing information on the application can result in a denial or reduced payments. The attorneys and staff at the Law Offices of Karen Kraus Bill have filed hundreds of applications. Contact us today for a free consultation.

Suppose you’ve spent most of your life working hard and paying into Social Security and are now unable to continue due to your age or a decline in your health. In that case, you may be eligible for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI). There are many qualifying factors that determine if you are eligible for SSDI, such as whether you can continue working, how severe your condition is, and whether you can do another type of work, to name a few. If you believe you qualify, the next step is to apply for SSDI benefits. Once you’re ready to apply, you might be wondering, “should I apply for SSDI on my own?” Acquiring assistance from an experienced disability attorney can make the process easier and increase your chances of being approved. 

What Is Involved In The SSDI Application Process?

Though it may appear as though applying for SSDI is as simple as filling out a few forms, there is much more that goes into the application process. There is an extensive amount of paperwork and communication with the Social Security Administration required for a successful outcome. Additionally, your medical evidence must be obtained and evaluated. 

Information Needed to Apply for SSDI Benefits

To apply for SSDI benefits, information regarding you, your medical condition, and your work history will be needed. 

Personal Information

Applying for SSDI benefits may require personal information such as:

  • Your date and place of birth
  • Your social security number
  • Your current or former spouse’s social security number and date of birth as well as the place of marriage and date of divorce or death if applicable
  • Name and birth dates of any children who are minors
  • Your banking information including bank name and routing number or account number

Medical Information

Medical information needed when applying for SSDI may include:

  • Name, address, and telephone number of someone who knows details about your medical condition to assist with application process
  • Names of medications you are taking and the prescribing doctor
  • Dates and names of any medical tests you have undergone 
  • Dates of treatments you have had along with names, addresses, phone numbers, and patient ID of the corresponding doctors or medical facility in which the care took place

Work Information

Your work history will play a part in determining your eligibility. Information needed may include:

  • Names and addresses of employers from the current year and year prior
  • The amount of money earned in the current year and previous year
  • A list of up to five jobs you have had in the last 15 years with dates of employment
  • A copy of your Social Security Statement
  • The start and end dates of any active-duty U.S. military service prior to 1968
  • Information regarding any workers’ compensation benefits you field or intended to file for

Benefits of Hiring a Disability Attorney to Apply for SSDI

When you choose to hire a disability attorney to assist you in the SSDI application process, you increase the likelihood that your application will be approved. A disability attorney is familiar with the Social Security Administration and the rules that pertain to SSDI applicants. They are also available to assist you in the long process of acquiring the necessary documents to help prove your eligibility. An experienced staff member will complete your application and review your information while checking for missing details or inconsistencies that could affect your approval. Errors and omissions may negatively impact your claim and could result in being denied SSDI benefits. If this happens, you can file an appeal, but this may cause a delay in receiving your benefits. 

Get Help Applying for SSDI Benefits

The disability attorneys at the Law Offices of Karen Kraus Bill understand the SSDI application process and want to make it as easy as possible for you. Having practiced disability law for more than 30 years, we are experienced lawyers for social security disability – ready to assist you with every step of the application process. Many people assume it is easy to be awarded benefits, but it’s not that simple. Applying for SSDI benefits is a complicated legal process that you shouldn’t have to navigate alone. Contact us today for a free consultation with one of our disability attorneys. 

Working hard for the majority of your life and then encountering an unexpected medical condition that keeps you from working can feel frustrating, scary, and uncertain. Throughout your career, you paid into the Social Security system, meaning you may be eligible for financial relief through Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI). 

SSDI Qualifications

Applying for SSDI is a complex process the requires a lot of information and documents. To qualify for SSDI, there are some specific requirements. The Social Security Administration (SSA) first needs to determine whether or not your medical condition qualifies as a disability under its guidelines which include:

  • Being unable to do the work you previously performed
  • Being unable to adjust to doing other work
  • Having a severe medical condition expected to last at least one year or result in death

The SSA will also ask questions such as:

What If I Was Denied SSDI?

Being in a situation where you need SSDI benefits can be challenging and stressful enough. Finding out that you have been denied social security disability might feel frightening, but do your best to remain hopeful. If you were denied SSDI you can appeal the decision for another chance to be approved. In fact, most disability benefits claims are denied on the first attempt, particularly those who apply themselves without the assistance of a disability attorney. By enlisting the help of an experienced disability attorney, you can begin the appeal process with assistance. 

Why Was My SSDI Claim Denied? 

There are many reasons why the Social Security Administration might deny an SSDI application. Some of them may include:

  • Earning too much money
  • Failure to show medical proof
  • An error in medical evidence submission
  • Not following your doctor’s suggested treatments
  • The SSA is unable to reach you
  • Filing the incorrect claim type

The good news is that some of these reasons for denial can be reevaluated in the appeals process. An experienced attorney will understand the reasons for your denial and increase your chances of being awarded SSDI when you appeal. 

What Can I Do After My SSDI Claim Was Denied?

If your SSDI claim was denied, you can begin the appeal process. There are four levels of appeal:

  • Request for Reconsideration
  • Hearing by an Administrative Law Judge
  • Appeals Council Request for Review
  • Federal District Court review

It is not recommended to attempt an SSDI denial without the assistance of an experienced disability attorney. There is a considerable amount of paperwork, medical evidence, and communication that will be needed during the application or appeal process. No one should have to fight for the benefits they deserve alone. Having an attorney assist you with the disability process will increase your chances of being approved. Disability attorneys have a vast knowledge of the Social Security claims process as well as insights into the specific requirements to get an approval. 

Get Help Appealing SSDI Benefits with The Law Offices of Karen Kraus Bill

At the Law Offices of Karen Kraus Bill in Columbia, MO, we have years of experience assisting people just like you in the SSDI appeals process. Having practiced disability law for more than 30 years, we are experienced lawyers for social security disability, ready to help you with every step of the application process. Right now, we understand that you may feel very confused or you might feel like giving up, but please know that denial isn’t the end of the road. We know that a lot is riding on whether or not you get approved, and that’s why we want to do everything we can to help you get a favorable outcome. If you were denied social security disability benefits, contact us today for a free evaluation

You’ve worked hard all your life, but now you’re unable to continue working due to your declining health, or maybe you’ve reached an age where you simply can’t anymore. You might be wondering if you are eligible for Social Security disability benefits. Which type of claim is right for you? Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) are disability benefit programs run by the Social Security Administration. The differences between these two programs can be confusing, so let’s discuss the major distinctions.

Social Security Disability Insurance

Social Security Disability Insurance, or SSDI, is considered an “entitlement program” that is generally available to anyone who has paid into the Social Security system for the last ten years. These recipients are considered “insured” because they have made their contribution to the Social Security trust fund through paying FICA Social Security taxes. SSDI provides benefits to people who cannot work enough due to certain medical conditions or disabilities. The amount of SSDI payments vary based on the beneficiary’s earnings record. SSDI recipients are eligible for medicare.

Who Can Apply for SSDI?

To be a candidate for SSDI, a person must have earned a particular number of work credits and be under the age of 65. Generally, an eligible individual would need to have worked at least five out of the last ten years. Federal law has strict definitions of disability, stating that the medical condition causing the disability be one that is expected to last one year or more, or potentially result in death. People with short-term or partial disabilities would not qualify. 

Supplemental Security Income

Supplemental Security Income, or SSI, is considered a “needs-based program,” meaning it is strictly for low-income American citizens and is funded by general taxes rather than from the Social Security trust fund. The standard federal SSI payment is a set amount that changes yearly based on the Cost-of-Living Adjustments (COLA). Additionally, most people who receive SSI will immediately qualify for benefits through Medicaid. 

Who Can Apply for SSI?

To meet the requirements for SSI, a person must have a very limited income and less than $2,000 in assets, or less than $3,000 for a couple. Most people who would qualify for SSI would also qualify for food stamps. Individuals over the age of 65 can qualify for SSI (regardless of their medical condition) if the income requirements are met. A person of any age, even children, can apply for SSI if they are disabled and have limited to no resources or income. 

Get Help Applying for Social Security Disability Benefits

It can be risky to apply for SSDI or SSI on your own. Many applications are initially denied due to mistakes or misinformation, unsuccessful attempts to collect medical evidence, and/or a failure to cooperate with the Social Security Administration. If your disability benefits application has been denied, we can help. There is a small window of time to appeal your denial, and statistics show you are more likely to get approved with the assistance of an attorney who is familiar with disability law.

Call Karen Kraus Bill

The Law Offices of Karen Kraus Bill has extensive experience handling disability law cases for SSDI or SSI. It is beneficial to have a skilled attorney on your side to help you get all of the necessary records in order to create the strongest application possible. We can also represent you during the appeals process if you were previously denied. We are ready to focus on winning your disability case so you can continue to take care of your health. Contact us today!