Many people qualifying for disability have one big question about the income they are going to be receiving. Is SSDI taxable? The question is not so simple to answer as it can vary based on your specific situation and location. Here is a breakdown of how taxable your SSDI may be.

Before receiving SSDI benefits, there are two major factors that must be in play to qualify for benefits. The first is the definition by which the government deems someone qualified to receive benefits:

First, the SSA says, “Your condition must significantly limit your ability to do basic work such as lifting, standing, walking, sitting, and remembering—for at least 12 months.” The condition must prevent you from doing the kind of work you did previously, and based on your age, education, experience, and transferable skills, you are unable to perform other work.

Additionally, you must have a pre-qualifying disability from the SSA’s Approved List and make less than $1310 in monthly wages.

SSDI has supported Americans since Social Security came into existence during the New Deal acts of the 1930s.

When do you pay Federal Tax for SSDI?

Generally, SSDI income is not taxable unless your federal taxable income is above a certain threshold. Currently, as of December 2020, the threshold for a single income amount that is not taxable is $25,000 and $32,000 when married and filing jointly.

State Tax Possibilities for SSDI

The above rules stand for federal taxation of SSDI, but what about State taxes? Historically, states have not taxed Social Security Income, including disability income. However, in recent years, some states have began implementing state-specific policies on how social security income is taxed. The following 13 states have their own policies in place:

  • Colorado
  • Connecticut
  • Kansas
  • Minnesota
  • Missouri
  • Montana
  • Nebraska
  • New Mexico
  • North Dakota
  • Rhode Island
  • Utah
  • Vermont
  • West Virginia

The state regulations on social security income often mirror the Federal regulations and simply add a state-specific layer to the way your income is taxed, but in some states, the regulations and ruling can differ slightly.

How Are SSDI Taxes Calculated?

Your reported income for taxes does not necessarily include the entirety of your disability income. The way this is calculated is based on your other sources of income and a portion of your social security income. If your calculated total is below the threshold set in your state or federally, you will not receive any taxes on your disability income. Additionally, this means that if your disability benefits are increased for any reason, you would potentially get taxed on a portion of that increase.

All of this can be confusing to navigate. This is one of the many reasons people often seek council with an experienced attorney to help them make sure they take the best route possible for their specific needs.

Need Help Navigating SSDI and Taxes?

Many of the questions people have about the income they receive can blur the lines of legal support and accounting support. Let our experienced social security disability lawyers help! Our attorneys have specialized in Social Security Disability Income and SSI legal services for over 30 years and we are prepared to help you through the process! Schedule a free consultation with one of the experienced attorneys at the Law Offices of Karen Kraus Bill.

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